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Biochemist and Biophysicist
 
 
Summary Job Description Education Skills, Abilities and Interests More Information
Skills, Abilities & Interests

Interest Area
InvestigativeInvolves working with ideas and requires an extensive amount of thinking.

Work Values
AchievementGet a feeling of accomplishment.
CreativityTry out your own ideas.
IndependenceWork alone.
SecurityHave steady employment.
Ability UtilizationMake use of individual abilities.
ActivityBusy all the time.
AutonomyPlan work with little supervision.
ResponsibilityMake decisions on your own.

Skills
Learning StrategiesUse multiple approaches when learning or teaching new things.
Critical ThinkingUse logic and analysis to identify the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches.
Active ListeningListen to what other people are saying and ask questions as appropriate.
WritingCommunicate effectively with others in writing as indicated by the needs of the audience.
Equipment SelectionDetermine the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.
Time ManagementManage one's own time and the time of others.
Active LearningWork with new material or information to grasp its implications.
Complex Problem SolvingSolving novel, ill-defined problems in complex, real-world settings.
CoordinationAdjust actions in relation to others' actions.
Reading ComprehensionUnderstand written sentences and paragraphs in work-related documents.
SpeakingTalk to others to effectively convey information.
ScienceUse scientific methods to solve problems.

Abilities
Deductive ReasoningAble to apply general rules to specific problems to come up with logical answers, including deciding whether an answer makes sense.
Written ComprehensionAble to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
Near VisionAble to see details of objects at a close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Information OrderingAble to correctly follow rules for arranging things or actions in a certain order, including numbers, words, pictures, procedures, and logical operations.
Inductive ReasoningAble to combine separate pieces of information, or specific answers to problems, to form general rules or conclusions. This includes coming up with a logical explanation for why seemingly unrelated events occur together.
Written ExpressionAble to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.